Structural bioinformatics (Virtual)

Date:

 Monday 23 Friday 27 November 2020

Venue: 

European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) - Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge,  CB10 1SD, United Kingdom

Application opens: 

Monday 13 July 2020

Application deadline: 

Friday 21 August 2020

Participation: 

Open application with selection

Contact: 

Meredith Willmott

Registration fee: 

£200.00

Dates additional information: 

Please note this course will now take place virtually.

Overview

Structural biology, determining the three-dimensional shapes of biomacromolecules and their complexes, can tell us a lot about how these molecules function and the roles they play within a cell. Bioinformatics data derived from structure determination experiments enables life-science researchers to address a wide variety of questions. For example, it aids the understanding of how mutations in a gene might alter a protein’s shape, disrupt a catalytic site, or alter the binding affinity of a pharmaceutical compound.

This course explores bioinformatics data resources and tools for the interpretation and exploitation of biomacromolecular structures. It will focus on how best to analyse available structural data to gain useful information given specific research contexts. The course content will investigate the impact of genetic variation on structure, predicting protein structure and function, and exploring interactions with other macromolecules as well as with low-MW compounds. Participants will also have an opportunity to explore protein docking using HADDOCK.

Additional information

All participants are expected to virtually present a poster during the course. Please send your poster in PDF format to Meredith Willmott (meredith@ebi.ac.uk), who will collate all the posters ready to present virtually. 

All posters should:

  • be A2 in size - 420mm x 594 mm 
  • be in a portrait orientation
  • include your photograph and contact information

We expect the posters to provide other delegates and trainers information on your research and will act as a talking point. They should give an idea of the work you are engaged in, what you are planning to do next, and anything of interest that might be useful for sharing with the gathered participants.