A neurogenic placode that arises at the level of the midbrain-hindbrain boundary and develops into a trigeminal ganglion. [ https://github.com/obophenotype/uberon/issues/693 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22512454 http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6601-2165 ]

This is just here as a test because I lose it

Term information

database cross reference
  • EHDAA2:0004209
  • XAO:0000225
  • TAO:0000162
  • EFO:0003433
  • VHOG:0000109
  • ZFA:0000162
Subsets

efo_slim

contributor

https://github.com/ANiknejad

https://github.com/cmungall

https://github.com/mellybelly

definition

A neurogenic placode that arises at the level of the midbrain-hindbrain boundary and develops into a trigeminal ganglion.

external definition

The ectodermal precursor of the trigeminal ganglion. The profundal and the trigeminal ganglia are separate distally but fused at their proximal end as they condense around NF stage 24.[XAO]

The ectodermal rudiment of the trigeminal ganglion, distinguishable during much of the segmentation period. Kimmel et al, 1995.[TAO]

has exact synonym

trigeminal V placode

trigeminal placode

has related synonym

profundus placode

trigeminal placodes

profundus V placode

homology notes

The dorsolateral placodes (trigeminal and vestibular) develop from ectoderm lateral to the brain (...). In summary, the collective term 'placodes' refers to some rather different structures, probably with different evolutionary origins. Some sensory placodes (at least the otic and olfactory) may have homologues in basal chordates. Even if this is so, it is apparent that they were elaborated considerably during early vertebrate evolution. Epibranchial and dorsolateral placodes appear to be new; we infer that their origin depended on the evolution of specific inductive signals.[well established][VHOG]

id

UBERON:0003070

terminology notes

Consider naming this 'trigeminal placode complex'. Also, Fig9-5 of ISBN:0471888893 calls this the profundus placode; XAO says 'profundal and the trigeminal ganglia are separate distally but fused at their proximal end...'