EBI metagenomics

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Project overview (ERP001739)

Follow-up of faecal microbiota in IBS patients

Last updated: 18-Feb-2014

Description

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder in western countries. The definition and treatment of IBS is challenging due to its largely unknown aetiology and the variety of symptoms it can present. Previous studies on IBS suggest subtle alterations in the composition of intestinal microbiota. However, no consensus has been reached regarding the association between specific bacteria and IBS. To overcome the confusion introduced by inter-subject variability and heterogeneity within IBS that is problematic in cross-sectional studies, we undertook a longitudinal study that allowed us to compare samples from single patients at moments with different type and/or severity of symptoms. We present results for two IBS patients with diarrhoea subtype and the healthy relative of one of them. Faecal samples collected every two days the first week and then weekly over two months were analysed through metagenomic and metatranscriptomic approaches. Overall, we detect a greater instability of faecal microbiota in IBS patients when compared to the control, and even larger instability associated with acute diarrheoa. Bacterial composition and encoded functions were fairly stable throughout. On the contrary, the fraction of active bacteria varied markedly in time. Strong and quick compositional shifts were associated with relapse, although with low reproducibility between and within patients. Similarly, changes in the global pattern of gene expression characterized days of worsening, but we could not identify genes or functions associated with relapse. Our results confirm that the association of microbiota with IBS is rather weak.

Experimental factor: time

Contact details

Institute:
CSISP
Name:
Ana Durban
Email:
ana.durban@uv.es

Associated samples

Sample name Sample ID Collection date Source
Patient 2 Day 21 ERS167153 20-Jul-2010 Host associated
Patient 2 Day 5 ERS167150 04-Jul-2010 Host associated
Patient 2 Day 3.2 ERS167148 02-Jul-2010 Host associated
Patient 2 Day 1 ERS167146 30-Aug-2010 Host associated
Patient 1 Day 37 ERS167144 29-Jul-2010 Host associated
Patient 1 Day 21 ERS167142 13-Jul-2010 Host associated
Control 1 Day 42 ERS167168 03-Aug-2010 Host associated
Control 1 Day 37 ERS167167 29-Jul-2010 Host associated
Control 1 Day 28 ERS167166 20-Jul-2010 Host associated
Control 1 Day 21 ERS167165 13-Jul-2010 Host associated
Control 1 Day 14 ERS167164 06-Jul-2010 Host associated
Control 1 Day 7 ERS167163 29-Jun-2010 Host associated
Control 1 Day 5 ERS167162 27-Jun-2010 Host associated
Control 1 Day 3 ERS167161 25-Jun-2010 Host associated
Control 1 Day 1 ERS167160 23-Jun-2010 Host associated
Patient 2 Day 56 ERS167159 24-Aug-2010 Host associated
Patient 2 Day 49 ERS167158 17-Aug-2010 Host associated
Patient 2 Day 42 ERS167157 10-Aug-2010 Host associated
Patient 2 Day 35 ERS167156 03-Aug-2010 Host associated
Patient 2 Day 28 ERS167155 27-Jul-2010 Host associated
Patient 2 Day 27 ERS167154 26-Jul-2010 Host associated
Patient 2 Day 14 ERS167152 13-Jul-2010 Host associated
Patient 2 Day 7 ERS167151 06-Jul-2010 Host associated
Patient 2 Day 4 ERS167149 03-Jul-2010 Host associated
Patient 2 Day 3.1 ERS167147 02-Jul-2010 Host associated
Patient 1 Day 42 ERS167145 03-Aug-2010 Host associated
Patient 1 Day 28 ERS167143 20-Jul-2010 Host associated
Patient 1 Day 14 ERS167141 06-Jul-2010 Host associated
Patient 1 Day 5 ERS167139 27-Jun-2010 Host associated
Patient 1 Day 3 ERS167138 25-Jun-2010 Host associated
Patient 1 Day 1 ERS167137 23-Jun-2010 Host associated

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