Equals, right? Exploring whether medical research benefits everyone equally

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Equals, right? Exploring whether medical research benefits everyone equally

Wednesday 29 May 2019

A free public event organised by EMBL-EBI.

Science, especially biology, aims to improve quality of life and benefit society by doing fair and impartial research. However, sometimes the biases that we see in society are reflected into scientific research.

How do social biases affect science? How does this affect different people? And what can we do to get rid of biases in research? 

Join us for a lively discussion on the topic on May 29, at 18:30, in LAB026, Lord Ashcroft Building, Anglia Ruskin University, East Road, Cambridge CB1 1PT.

Free entry.

Registration

Programme

18:30 Welcome and introductions
18:40 How gender bias in biomedical research impacts women's lives and what can we do about it?
Dr. Noel Bairey Merz 
Chair of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-sponsored WISE initiative
19:10 Understanding ethnic differences in heart disease: culture, colour or cholesterol?
Nishi Chaturvedi

Professor of Clinical Epidemiology at the National Heart and Lung Institute
19:40 Bias in AI: who's in charge?
Joanna J Bryson
Associate Professor in the Department of Computing at the University of Bath
20:10 Q&A and discussion
21:00 Drinks and nibbles
21:30 Event ends

Speakers

Noel Bairey Merz

Noel Bairey Merz: Chair of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute-sponsored WISE (Women's Ischemic Syndrome Evaluation) initiative

How gender bias in biomedical research impacts women's lives and what can we do about it?

Biography

Dr. Bairey Merz is chair of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-sponsored WISE (Women's Ischemic Syndrome Evaluation) initiative, which is investigating potential methods for more effective diagnosis, evaluation and treatment of ischemic heart disease in women. Her research interests include cardiovascular disease and its links to mental stress, exercise, diet, adverse pregnancy outcomes and precision medicine.
Dr. Bairey Merz has received grants from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the National Institutes of Aging (NIA), the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program – Department of Defense (CDMRP-DoD), the California Institute for Precision Medicine, and the Society for Women’s Health Research.
 
Nishi Chaturvedi

Nishi Chaturvedi: Professor of Clinical Epidemiology at the National Heart and Lung Institute

Understanding ethnic differences in heart disease: culture, colour or cholesterol?

Biography

Professor Chaturvedi obtained her first degree in medicine at London University in 1985, and then went on to specialist training in general medicine, public health and epidemiology. Her post-doctoral positions were held at the Department of Epidemiology at UCL. Professor Chaturvedi was appointed to a chair of clinical epidemiology in the National Heart & Lung Institute at Imperial College London in 2000. She returned to a chair in clinical epidemiology in the Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences at UCL in 2013, and was awarded Directorship of the MRC Lifelong Health and Ageing Unit at UCL in 2017. Professor Chaturvedi has two key related interests: understanding and preventing diabetes associated complications, in particular, cardiovascular disease, and secondly, ethnic differences in the cardiometabolic syndrome.  Professor Chaturvedi performed one of the largest studies of cardiovascular disease and diabetes in the UK ethnic minority community (the Brent study).

Joanna J Bryson

Joanna J Bryson: Associate Professor in the Department of Computing at the University of Bath.

Bias in AI: who's in charge?

Biography

Joanna J Bryson is a Reader [tenured Associate Professor, USA] in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Bath. She lives in Princeton, NJ, where she was a sabbatical fellow in 2015-2016 at Princeton's Center for Information Technology Policy and an affiliate for the following two years. She is also currently doing research with the Princeton Departments of Politics and Psychology.

At Bath she founded, and for some years lead, the Bath Intelligent Systems research group. Most of her own research is done in the context of the subgroup Artificial Models of Natural Intelligence (AmonI). Although she now only works for Bath remotely and for 40% time, she still teaches and supervises dissertation students.

Anglia Ruskin University
Cambridge Campus East Road Cambridge CB1 1PT United Kingdom

Contact us

Have questions about the event? Please contact:

Twitter: #scibias

This event is free to attend, but spaces are limited. Please register in advance to avoid disappointment.

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Event organiser

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