TitleAmino Acid Changes in Disease-Associated Variants Differ Radically from Variants Observed in the 1000 Genomes Project Dataset
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
Authorsde Beer TA, Laskowski RA, Parks SL, Sipos B, Goldman N, Thornton JM
JournalPLoS Comput Biol
Volume9
Paginatione1003382
AbstractThe 1000 Genomes Project data provides a natural background dataset for amino acid germline mutations in humans. Since the direction of mutation is known, the amino acid exchange matrix generated from the observed nucleotide variants is asymmetric and the mutabilities of the different amino acids are very different. These differences predominantly reflect preferences for nucleotide mutations in the DNA (especially the high mutation rate of the CpG dinucleotide, which makes arginine mutability very much higher than other amino acids) rather than selection imposed by protein structure constraints, although there is evidence for the latter as well. The variants occur predominantly on the surface of proteins (82%), with a slight preference for sites which are more exposed and less well conserved than random. Mutations to functional residues occur about half as often as expected by chance. The disease-associated amino acid variant distributions in OMIM are radically different from those expected on the basis of the 1000 Genomes dataset. The disease-associated variants preferentially occur in more conserved sites, compared to 1000 Genomes mutations. Many of the amino acid exchange profiles appear to exhibit an anti-correlation, with common exchanges in one dataset being rare in the other. Disease-associated variants exhibit more extreme differences in amino acid size and hydrophobicity. More modelling of the mutational processes at the nucleotide level is needed, but these observations should contribute to an improved prediction of the effects of specific variants in humans.
URLhttp://www.ploscompbiol.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pcbi.1003382
DOI10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003382