Family

Caveolin (IPR001612)

Short name: Caveolin

Family relationships

Description

Caveolae are 50-100 nm invaginations located at the plasma membrane of many cell types and are known to transport molecules across endothelial cells [PMID: 9759488]. Caveolae require the caveolin protein for formation. Caveolins may act as scaffolding proteins within caveolar membranes by compartmentalizing and concentrating signalling molecules. Mammals have three caveolin proteins:caveolin-1 (Cav-1, or VIP21), caveolin-2 and caveolin-3 (or M-caveolin). Various classes of signalling molecules, including G-protein subunits, receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and small GTPases, bind Cav-1 through its 'caveolin-scaffolding domain' [PMID: 23028656].

Caveolins are proteins of about 20 Kd, they form high molecular mass homo-oligomers. Structurally they seem to have N-terminal and C-terminal hydrophilic segments and a long central transmembrane domain that probably forms a hairpin in the membrane. Both extremities are known to face the cytoplasm. Caveolae are enriched with cholesterol and Cav-1 is one of the few proteins that binds cholesterol tightly and specifically.

GO terms

Biological Process

GO:0070836 caveola assembly

Molecular Function

No terms assigned in this category.

Cellular Component

No terms assigned in this category.

Contributing signatures

Signatures from InterPro member databases are used to construct an entry.
Pfam
PANTHER