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    The database and ontology of Chemical Entities of Biological Interest

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05 January 2015 - ChEBI release 123

ChEBI release 123 is now available, with 42318 fully annotated entities.

See our entity of the month, Testosterone
http://www.ebi.ac.uk/chebi/entityMonthForward.do

With kind regards,
the ChEBI team

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01 December 2014 - ChEBI release 122 is now available

ChEBI release 122 is now available, with 42089 fully annotated entities.

See our entity of the month, Ergometrine
http://www.ebi.ac.uk/chebi/entityMonthForward.do

With kind regards,
the ChEBI team

More >>


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Entity of the month
1st January 2015
Testosterone

Testosterone (CHEBI:17347) was first isolated from bull testes in 1935 by Ernst Lanquer and a team of scientists at Organon International, based in Oss, in the south of the Netherlands [1]. The results of their experiments were published as "On crystalline Male Hormone from Testicles (testosterone)", coining the name for the newly isolated hormone (from stems of testicle and sterol, and the suffix of ketone). Biologically synthesised in the Leydig cells of testes and adrenal glands, the effects of testosterone can be classified as virilising (involved in biological development of sexually differentiating characteristics) and anabolic (growth of muscle mass and strength, bone density and maturation).

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Chemical Entities of Biological Interest (ChEBI) is a freely available dictionary of molecular entities focused on ‘small’ chemical compounds.
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