Novak2004-A Model for Restriction Point Control of the Mammalian Cell Cycle

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Model Identifier
MODEL2006080001
Short description
<notes xmlns="http://www.sbml.org/sbml/level2/version4"> <body xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"> <pre>Inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide blocks subsequent division of a mammalian cell, but only if the cell is exposed to the drug before the "restriction point" (i.e. within the first several hours after birth). If exposed to cycloheximide after the restriction point, a cell proceeds with DNA synthesis, mitosis and cell division and halts in the next cell cycle. If cycloheximide is later removed from the culture medium, treated cells will return to the division cycle, showing a complex pattern of division times post-treatment, as first measured by Zetterberg and colleagues. We simulate these physiological responses of mammalian cells to transient inhibition of growth, using a set of nonlinear differential equations based on a realistic model of the molecular events underlying progression through the cell cycle. The model relies on our earlier work on the regulation of cyclin-dependent protein kinases during the cell division cycle of yeast. The yeast model is supplemented with equations describing the effects of retinoblastoma protein on cell growth and the synthesis of cyclins A and E, and with a primitive representation of the signaling pathway that controls synthesis of cyclin D.</pre> </body> </notes>
Format
SBML (L2V4)
Related Publication
  • A model for restriction point control of the mammalian cell cycle.
  • Bela Novak, Tyson JJ
  • Journal of theoretical biology , 10/ 2004 , Volume 230 , Issue 4 , pages: 563-579 , PubMed ID: 15363676
  • Molecular Network Dynamics Research Group of Hungarian Academy of Sciences and Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Gellert ter 4, 1521 Budapest, Hungary.
  • Inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide blocks subsequent division of a mammalian cell, but only if the cell is exposed to the drug before the "restriction point" (i.e. within the first several hours after birth). If exposed to cycloheximide after the restriction point, a cell proceeds with DNA synthesis, mitosis and cell division and halts in the next cell cycle. If cycloheximide is later removed from the culture medium, treated cells will return to the division cycle, showing a complex pattern of division times post-treatment, as first measured by Zetterberg and colleagues. We simulate these physiological responses of mammalian cells to transient inhibition of growth, using a set of nonlinear differential equations based on a realistic model of the molecular events underlying progression through the cell cycle. The model relies on our earlier work on the regulation of cyclin-dependent protein kinases during the cell division cycle of yeast. The yeast model is supplemented with equations describing the effects of retinoblastoma protein on cell growth and the synthesis of cyclins A and E, and with a primitive representation of the signaling pathway that controls synthesis of cyclin D.
Contributors
Ahmad Zyoud

Metadata information

isDescribedBy
PubMed 15363676
hasProperty
Mathematical Modelling Ontology Ordinary differential equation model
Gene Ontology cell cycle
C17767
GO:0070848
hasTaxon

Curation status
Non-curated


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Model files

Nov?k2004.xml SBML L2V4 Novák2004-A Model for Restriction Point Control of the Mammalian Cell Cycle 192.48 KB Preview | Download

Additional files

Nov?k2004.cps COPASI version 4.27 (Build 217) Novák2004-A Model for Restriction Point Control of the Mammalian Cell Cycle 334.40 KB Preview | Download

  • Model originally submitted by : Ahmad Zyoud
  • Submitted: Jun 8, 2020 3:14:19 PM
  • Last Modified: Jun 8, 2020 3:14:19 PM
Revisions
  • Version: 2 public model Download this version
    • Submitted on: Jun 8, 2020 3:14:19 PM
    • Submitted by: Ahmad Zyoud
    • With comment: Edited model metadata online.
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