spacer

GO:0006281 DNA repair

Term Information

ID GO:0006281
Name DNA repair
Ontology Biological Process
Definition The process of restoring DNA after damage. Genomes are subject to damage by chemical and physical agents in the environment (e.g. UV and ionizing radiations, chemical mutagens, fungal and bacterial toxins, etc.) and by free radicals or alkylating agents endogenously generated in metabolism. DNA is also damaged because of errors during its replication. A variety of different DNA repair pathways have been reported that include direct reversal, base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, photoreactivation, bypass, double-strand break repair pathway, and mismatch repair pathway.
PMID:11563486
GONUTS GO:0006281 Wiki Page

Annotation Guidance

Usage of this term is subject to the following annotation guidelines:
Annotation Guidelines
Guidance for interpreting DNA repair investigationsLink

GO Slims

This term is present in the following GO Consortium-maintained GO slims:
GO slim nameCount of all terms
goslim_pir462
goslim_pombe48
goslim_yeast169

Cross-references

Database ID
InterPro IPR000035
InterPro IPR000085
InterPro IPR000093
InterPro IPR000191
InterPro IPR000214
InterPro IPR000686
InterPro IPR000977
InterPro IPR001126
InterPro IPR001238
InterPro IPR001497
InterPro IPR001679
InterPro IPR001719
InterPro IPR002008
InterPro IPR002043
InterPro IPR002081
InterPro IPR002176
InterPro IPR003011
InterPro IPR003021
InterPro IPR003561
InterPro IPR003562
InterPro IPR003563
InterPro IPR003564
InterPro IPR003583
InterPro IPR003717
InterPro IPR004026
InterPro IPR004149
InterPro IPR004150
InterPro IPR004504
InterPro IPR004574
InterPro IPR004576
InterPro IPR004577
InterPro IPR004579
InterPro IPR004580
InterPro IPR004582
InterPro IPR004584
InterPro IPR004585
InterPro IPR004586
InterPro IPR004591
InterPro IPR004595
InterPro IPR004604
InterPro IPR004605
InterPro IPR004609
InterPro IPR004610
InterPro IPR004612
InterPro IPR004791
InterPro IPR004807
InterPro IPR004808
InterPro IPR005101
InterPro IPR005118
InterPro IPR005227
InterPro IPR006084
InterPro IPR006085
InterPro IPR006167
InterPro IPR006642
InterPro IPR006932
InterPro IPR007150
InterPro IPR007232
InterPro IPR007517
InterPro IPR007581
InterPro IPR008148
InterPro IPR008332
InterPro IPR008822
InterPro IPR008823
InterPro IPR008824
InterPro IPR010285
InterPro IPR010347
InterPro IPR011114
InterPro IPR011257
InterPro IPR011364
InterPro IPR011513
InterPro IPR011938
InterPro IPR011939
InterPro IPR011941
InterPro IPR012092
InterPro IPR012112
InterPro IPR012308
InterPro IPR012309
InterPro IPR012310
InterPro IPR013620
InterPro IPR013765
InterPro IPR013849
InterPro IPR013970
InterPro IPR014048
InterPro IPR014646
InterPro IPR015361
InterPro IPR015381
InterPro IPR015519
InterPro IPR015525
InterPro IPR015637
InterPro IPR015887
InterPro IPR015967
InterPro IPR016256
InterPro IPR016580
InterPro IPR016588
InterPro IPR017961
InterPro IPR017963
InterPro IPR018078
InterPro IPR018085
InterPro IPR018239
InterPro IPR018324
InterPro IPR018394
InterPro IPR018552
InterPro IPR018574
InterPro IPR018982
InterPro IPR020629
InterPro IPR020847
InterPro IPR020848
InterPro IPR023546
InterPro IPR026171
InterPro IPR026584
InterPro IPR026632
InterPro IPR026678
InterPro IPR026848
InterPro IPR026963
InterPro IPR026985
InterPro IPR027011
InterPro IPR027030
InterPro IPR027050
InterPro IPR027109
InterPro IPR027131
InterPro IPR027132
InterPro IPR027249
InterPro IPR027520
InterPro IPR027664
InterPro IPR027667
InterPro IPR027784
InterPro IPR027786
InterPro IPR029251
InterPro IPR029448
InterPro IPR029505
InterPro IPR029683
InterPro IPR029685
InterPro IPR029703
InterPro IPR029710
InterPro IPR030101
UniProtKB-KW DNA excision
UniProtKB-KW DNA repair
Wikipedia DNA_repair

Replaces

This term can be used instead of these obsolete terms:
GO Identifier GO Term Name Reason
GO:0006280 mutagenesis CONSIDER GO:0006281

Ancestor Chart

This chart is interactive; you can click on the term boxes and legend for more information.
Display options
Display
Key
GO IDs
Term box width
Term box height
Slim colours
Show children
Image size limit (in megapixels)
Note that setting the limit too high may result in images being generated slowly; it may even cause the browser to crash. The maximum limit is 20 megapixels.

Child Terms

This table lists all terms that are direct descendants (child terms) of GO:0006281:
Relationship To GO:0006281 Child Term Child Term Name
Part of GO:0051103 DNA ligation involved in DNA repair
Regulates GO:0006282 regulation of DNA repair
Is a GO:0046787 viral DNA repair
Part of GO:0000731 DNA synthesis involved in DNA repair
Is a GO:0010213 non-photoreactive DNA repair
Is a GO:0043504 mitochondrial DNA repair
Is a GO:0000012 single strand break repair
Is a GO:0006298 mismatch repair
Is a GO:0006301 postreplication repair
Is a GO:0006302 double-strand break repair
Is a GO:0045004 DNA replication proofreading
Is a GO:0006290 pyrimidine dimer repair
Is a GO:0000725 recombinational repair
Is a GO:0000726 non-recombinational repair
Is a GO:0006284 base-excision repair
Is a GO:0006289 nucleotide-excision repair
Part of GO:0006307 DNA dealkylation involved in DNA repair
Negatively regulates GO:0045738 negative regulation of DNA repair
Positively regulates GO:0045739 positive regulation of DNA repair
Is a GO:0070914 UV-damage excision repair
Is a GO:0036297 interstrand cross-link repair
Part of GO:1902113 nucleotide phosphorylation involved in DNA repair

Protein Annotation

Displaying annotations FIRST to LAST of TOTAL Page size: Additional filters: Bookmarkable link
Database
Gene Product ID
Symbol
Qualifier
GO Identifier
GO Term Name
Aspect
Original GO ID
Original GO Term Name
Evidence
Reference
With
Taxon
Date
Assigned By
Product Form ID
Name
Synonym
Type
Taxon Name
Sequence

Export

Display options

ID Mapping

QuickGO maps between different identifier types by using a combination of mapping files provided by the databases, and using identifier cross-references supplied by UniProtKB.

If more than one identifier type needs to be used to map all required sequences, drag the selected databases to change the order in which identifiers are found.

Filter

Select

Grouped by
Annotation count
Protein count
Both

Co-occurring Terms

These tables show the number of times the term listed in the table has been co-annotated with GO:0006281. The terms are listed in descending order of number of times the term has been co-annotated.
The table on the left is calculated using both electronic and manual-evidenced annotations, while the table on the right is calculated using only manual-evidenced annotations.
Co-occurrence statistics for GO:0006281 based on the entire annotation set Co-occurrence statistics for GO:0006281 based on non-IEA annotations only

Change Log

All changes

Timestamp Action Category Detail
2014-02-17 Added RELATION is a GO:0044763 (single-organism cellular process)
2013-11-28 Added RELATION is a GO:0044710 (single-organism metabolic process)
2013-04-18 Updated SLIM goslim_yeast
2013-04-18 Updated SLIM goslim_pombe
2013-04-18 Updated SLIM goslim_pir
2011-08-14 Added SLIM goslim_yeast
2010-02-27 Added RELATION is a GO:0006974 (cellular response to DNA damage stimulus)
2010-02-27 Deleted RELATION is a GO:0034984 (cellular response to DNA damage stimulus)
2009-05-11 Added SLIM goslim_pombe
2009-03-02 Added XREF Wikipedia:DNA_repair
2008-10-02 Added RELATION is a GO:0034984 (cellular response to DNA damage stimulus)
2008-10-02 Deleted RELATION is a GO:0006974 (cellular response to DNA damage stimulus)
2008-06-09 Added SLIM goslim_pir
2008-05-13 Added DEFINITION The process of restoring DNA after damage. Genomes are subject to damage by chemical and physical agents in the environment (e.g. UV and ionizing radiations, chemical mutagens, fungal and bacterial toxins, etc.) and by free radicals or alkylating agents endogenously generated in metabolism. DNA is also damaged because of errors during its replication. A variety of different DNA repair pathways have been reported that include direct reversal, base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, photoreactivation, bypass, double-strand break repair pathway, and mismatch repair pathway.
2008-05-12 Deleted DEFINITION The process of restoring DNA after damage. Genomes are subject to damage by chemical and physical agents in the environment (e.g. UV and ionizing radiations, chemical mutagens, fungal and bacterial toxins, etc.) and by free radicals or alkylating agents endogenously generated in metabolism. DNA is also damaged because of errors during its replication. A variety of different DNA repair pathways have been reported that include direct reversal, base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, photoreactivation, bypass, double-strand break repair pathway, and mismatch repair pathway.
2008-04-01 Updated RELATION is a GO:0006259 (DNA metabolic process)
2008-04-01 Updated RELATION is a GO:0006974 (cellular response to DNA damage stimulus)
2004-03-13 Updated DEFINITION The process of restoring DNA after damage. Genomes are subject to damage by chemical and physical agents in the environment (e.g. UV and ionizing radiations, chemical mutagens, fungal and bacterial toxins, etc.) and by free radicals or alkylating agents endogenously generated in metabolism. DNA is also damaged because of errors during its replication. A variety of different DNA repair pathways have been reported that include direct reversal, base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, photoreactivation, bypass, double-strand break repair pathway, and mismatch repair pathway.
2003-10-18 Updated DEFINITION The process of restoring DNA after damage. Genomes are subject to damage by chemical and physical agents in the environment (eg. UV and ionizing radiations, chemical mutagens, fungal and bacterial toxins, etc.) and by free radicals or alkylating agents endogenously generated in metabolism. DNA is also damaged because of errors during its replication. A variety of different DNA repair pathways have been reported that include direct reversal, base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, photoreactivation, bypass, double-strand break repair pathway, and mismatch repair pathway.
2003-04-24 Updated DEFINITION The process of restoring DNA after damage. Genomes are subject to damage by chemical and physical agents in the environment (e. g. UV and ionizing radiations, chemical mutagens, fungal and bacterial toxins, etc.) and by free radicals or alkylating agents endogenously generated in metabolism. DNA is also damaged because of errors during its replication. A variety of different DNA repair pathways have been reported that include direct reversal, base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, photoreactivation, bypass, double-strand break repair pathway, and mismatch repair pathway.
2003-04-12 Updated DEFINITION The process of restoring DNA after damage. Genomes are subject to damage by chemical and physical agents in the environment (e.g. UV and ionizing radiations, chemical mutagens, fungal and bacterial toxins, etc.) and by free radicals or alkylating agents endogenously generated in metabolism. DNA is also damaged because of errors during its replication. A variety of different DNA repair pathways have been reported that include direct reversal, base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, photoreactivation, bypass, double-strand break repair pathway, and mismatch repair pathway.
2002-11-27 Added DEFINITION The process of restoring DNA after damage. Genomes are subject to damage by chemical and physical agents in the environment (e.g., UV and ionizing. radiations, chemical mutagens, fungal and bacterial toxins, etc.) and by free radicals or alkylating agents endogenously generated in metabolism. DNA is also damaged because of errors during its replication. A variety of different DNA repair pathways have been reported that include direct reversal, base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, photoreactivation, bypass, double-strand break repair pathway, and mismatch repair pathway.
2002-02-06 Updated TERM DNA repair
2001-04-03 Updated TERM DNA repair
2001-03-30 Added TERM DNA repair

Term

Timestamp Action Category Detail
2002-02-06 Updated TERM DNA repair
2001-04-03 Updated TERM DNA repair
2001-03-30 Added TERM DNA repair

Definition/synonyms

Timestamp Action Category Detail
2008-05-13 Added DEFINITION The process of restoring DNA after damage. Genomes are subject to damage by chemical and physical agents in the environment (e.g. UV and ionizing radiations, chemical mutagens, fungal and bacterial toxins, etc.) and by free radicals or alkylating agents endogenously generated in metabolism. DNA is also damaged because of errors during its replication. A variety of different DNA repair pathways have been reported that include direct reversal, base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, photoreactivation, bypass, double-strand break repair pathway, and mismatch repair pathway.
2008-05-12 Deleted DEFINITION The process of restoring DNA after damage. Genomes are subject to damage by chemical and physical agents in the environment (e.g. UV and ionizing radiations, chemical mutagens, fungal and bacterial toxins, etc.) and by free radicals or alkylating agents endogenously generated in metabolism. DNA is also damaged because of errors during its replication. A variety of different DNA repair pathways have been reported that include direct reversal, base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, photoreactivation, bypass, double-strand break repair pathway, and mismatch repair pathway.
2004-03-13 Updated DEFINITION The process of restoring DNA after damage. Genomes are subject to damage by chemical and physical agents in the environment (e.g. UV and ionizing radiations, chemical mutagens, fungal and bacterial toxins, etc.) and by free radicals or alkylating agents endogenously generated in metabolism. DNA is also damaged because of errors during its replication. A variety of different DNA repair pathways have been reported that include direct reversal, base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, photoreactivation, bypass, double-strand break repair pathway, and mismatch repair pathway.
2003-10-18 Updated DEFINITION The process of restoring DNA after damage. Genomes are subject to damage by chemical and physical agents in the environment (eg. UV and ionizing radiations, chemical mutagens, fungal and bacterial toxins, etc.) and by free radicals or alkylating agents endogenously generated in metabolism. DNA is also damaged because of errors during its replication. A variety of different DNA repair pathways have been reported that include direct reversal, base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, photoreactivation, bypass, double-strand break repair pathway, and mismatch repair pathway.
2003-04-24 Updated DEFINITION The process of restoring DNA after damage. Genomes are subject to damage by chemical and physical agents in the environment (e. g. UV and ionizing radiations, chemical mutagens, fungal and bacterial toxins, etc.) and by free radicals or alkylating agents endogenously generated in metabolism. DNA is also damaged because of errors during its replication. A variety of different DNA repair pathways have been reported that include direct reversal, base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, photoreactivation, bypass, double-strand break repair pathway, and mismatch repair pathway.
2003-04-12 Updated DEFINITION The process of restoring DNA after damage. Genomes are subject to damage by chemical and physical agents in the environment (e.g. UV and ionizing radiations, chemical mutagens, fungal and bacterial toxins, etc.) and by free radicals or alkylating agents endogenously generated in metabolism. DNA is also damaged because of errors during its replication. A variety of different DNA repair pathways have been reported that include direct reversal, base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, photoreactivation, bypass, double-strand break repair pathway, and mismatch repair pathway.
2002-11-27 Added DEFINITION The process of restoring DNA after damage. Genomes are subject to damage by chemical and physical agents in the environment (e.g., UV and ionizing. radiations, chemical mutagens, fungal and bacterial toxins, etc.) and by free radicals or alkylating agents endogenously generated in metabolism. DNA is also damaged because of errors during its replication. A variety of different DNA repair pathways have been reported that include direct reversal, base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, photoreactivation, bypass, double-strand break repair pathway, and mismatch repair pathway.

Relationships

Timestamp Action Category Detail
2014-02-17 Added RELATION is a GO:0044763 (single-organism cellular process)
2013-11-28 Added RELATION is a GO:0044710 (single-organism metabolic process)
2010-02-27 Added RELATION is a GO:0006974 (cellular response to DNA damage stimulus)
2010-02-27 Deleted RELATION is a GO:0034984 (cellular response to DNA damage stimulus)
2008-10-02 Added RELATION is a GO:0034984 (cellular response to DNA damage stimulus)
2008-10-02 Deleted RELATION is a GO:0006974 (cellular response to DNA damage stimulus)
2008-04-01 Updated RELATION is a GO:0006259 (DNA metabolic process)
2008-04-01 Updated RELATION is a GO:0006974 (cellular response to DNA damage stimulus)

Cross-references

Timestamp Action Category Detail
2009-03-02 Added XREF Wikipedia:DNA_repair

Other

Timestamp Action Category Detail
2013-04-18 Updated SLIM goslim_yeast
2013-04-18 Updated SLIM goslim_pombe
2013-04-18 Updated SLIM goslim_pir
2011-08-14 Added SLIM goslim_yeast
2009-05-11 Added SLIM goslim_pombe
2008-06-09 Added SLIM goslim_pir
spacer
Please send comments, suggestions or bug reports to goa@ebi.ac.uk. Click here for details of how to cite UniProt-GOA and QuickGO.
14ms